phenpro.com

CONTACT US

Contact Dr. Anchors

DR. ANCHORS

About Dr. Anchors
Interview with Dr. Anchors
Dr. Anchors' Weight Loss Lessons
Dr. Anchor's Book: Medical Myths Doctors Believe
Dr. Anchor's Book: Life Between Meals
Dr. Anchor's Book: Safer Than Phen-Fen

PHEN-PRO

What is Phen-Pro?
FDA Approval for Phen-Pro
Why does 5-HTP work?

FORUMS

Discussion Forums Recent Forum Topics

SEARCH THIS SITE


Advanced Search

SEARCH THE WEB

Google

MEMBERS

Login
Register

MAILING LIST

CATEGORIES

5-HTP
Attention Deficit Disorder
BMI Table
BMI Table for Children
Calorie Counting
Carbohydrates
Childhood Obesity
Contact Dr. Anchors
Diet Pills
Diet Soda
Diet: What should I eat?
Dogma
Dr. Anchors' Weight Loss Lessons
Exercise
Fake Diet Pills
Fenfluramine
French (The French)
How To Live A Long Time
Interview with Michael Anchors, MD, PhD
Kidney Stones
Medical Myths
Men and Weight Loss
Men and Women, Differences
Metabolism
Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity
Obesity, Ideas about the cause
Opinion
People Who Don't Lose Weight
Phen-Pro
Phentermine
Science
Soda (colas)
Sweeteners
The Media
Weight Loss Patients
Weight Loss Scams
Weight Loss Tips
Weight Loss, General articles
What I've Learned from Patients
Who is Dr. Anchors?

ARCHIVES

September, 2017
August, 2017
May, 2017
April, 2017
March, 2017
February, 2017
January, 2017
November, 2016
September, 2016
August, 2016
July, 2016
April, 2016

ARCHIVE SUMMARY

View by Date
View by Category

RSS / XML


RSS 1.0
RSS 2.0
RSS Atom
Home page  >  Article | Previous article | Next article

QUICKLINKS AND VIEW OPITONS

  • Articles with Recent Comments
  • Recent Forum Topics
  • Summary View
  • Headline View
  • Category View
  • Archive of Quotes
  • ​Why does 5-HTP work?


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Sunday, April 08, 2012 11:54 am Email this article

    Although 1/3 of patients lose weight well with simple phen-pro, 2/3 of them lose only some of their excess weight and then get "stuck". When one asks them about it, many of them say that although the basic phen-pro suppressed their appetite well in the beginning, after a few weeks or months, their excess appetite spartially returned. If one adds 5-HTP to the mix at that point, the extra hunger goes away again and the patients resume their weight loss.

    There are two theories about this. The most common idea is that when patients have been on Prozac or other SSRI drugs for a prolonged period, the brain may be depleted in serotonin. SSRI drugs cause serotonin to spend more time in the synapse whence it is more easily lost than when it is sequestered in the neuron. When the serotonin level falls low enough, release into the synapse is reduced and Prozac has less effect since it is only a re-uptake inhibitor. When Prozac starts to falter, phentermine loses its effect also just as it does when taken alone (see the graph from the Eli Lilly study on this website). 5-HTP , 5-hydroxytryptophan, is the material from which serotonin is made. Taking 5-HTP orally causes an increase in serotonin in the brain if a sufficient dose is taken . When the serotonin level is restored, Prozac resumes its action on phentermine. The second theory is based on research by Japanese researchers (Yamada, Sugimoto and Ujikawa, European Journal of Pharmacology 1999; 383: 49-51). They gave 5-HTP to mice and showed that it considerably raised their levels of leptin. Leptin is the hormone produced by adipose tissue that signals to the brain the total body fat content. It reduces hunger. Therefore, 5-HTP may reduce hunger through leptin without ever itself entering the brain.

    Articles on the same subject can be found here:


    COMMENTS

    Please feel free to share your comments about this article.


    Name:

    Email:

    Comments:

    Please enter the word you see in the image below:


    Remember my personal information

    Notify me of follow-up comments?



    © Copyright 2003-2017 - Michael Anchors, MD, PhD - All Rights Reserved.